Damascus or Dimashq

Damascus is one of the world's oldest continuously inhabited cities. Population (1992 estimate) 1,451,000.  Capital of Syria, situated on a plateau 680 metres above sea level, bordered by the Anti-Lebanon Mountains to the west, and the desert to the east.

The economy of Damascus is based upon governmental administrative activities, processed food, clothing, and printed material.

Damascus has long been an important commercial center. In former times it was famous for dried fruit, wine, wool, linens, and silks. Today the city is the trading center for figs, almonds, and other fruit produced in the surrounding region. Damascus still hold traditional handicrafts up, such as silk cloth, leather goods, filigreed gold, silver objects, inlaid wooden, copper, and brass articles.

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Industries in Damascus include handicrafts, such as the weaving of silk cloth and the making of leather goods, filigreed gold and silver objects, and inlaid wooden, copper, and brass articles. Among the city's other manufactures are processed food, clothing, and printed material.

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Damascus is one of the world's oldest continuously inhabited cities, and reports run back at least 3,500 years.

Damascus is made up of a sizeable old city, divided into the market area, Muslim area, Christian area, and the Jewish area. All three groups are still represented in Damascus. The modern city is mainly grey with little green, and the architecture and quality of the buildings are influenced by Syria's weak economy.

Damascus has a university, many museums, and embassies. Damascus was from 661 to 750 the centre of Islam, when the Caliph used it as centre of administration. This history is notable with buildings like the Ummawiyy mosque.

Major cities near Damascus:

Ankara

Riyadh

Amman

Baghdad

Tehran

Cairo

Alexandria

Baku

Tabriz